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Difference between BCS and BS Software Engineering


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#1
Rafay

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I'm confused and I need clear answers. What exactly is the difference between BCS? (Bachelor of Computer Science) and BS (Bachelor of Science) in Software Engineering? What are their scopes in different countries at this moment? I want to be a Software Engineer, as it's my passion and interest. I know this may sound a bit stupid but I just want to clear it. I'll pass out from my intermediate studies next year when I get choose what I want to be. So, the hell is BCS and BS in Software Engineering, if you are doing BCS, does it means you are being taught Software Engineering as well?

Sorry for being kinda stupid but I live in a country where Computer studies haven't got any popularity yet, so I didn't get any help from friends. I want to be one of the few in my country who'd like to study computers, particularly software engineering.

#2
soulcyon

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A simple one-liner that may remove confusion: Computer Science is more theory-oriented (algorithms, and such) while Software engineering is practice-oriented (actually making practical programs for real-world situations). It's sort of like the general difference between Engineering and Sciences, where Science analyzes the nature (of his field), notes observations and hypothesizes while Engineering creates things based on those observations then analyzes.
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#3
Rafay

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A simple one-liner that may remove confusion: Computer Science is more theory-oriented (algorithms, and such) while Software engineering is practice-oriented (actually making practical programs for real-world situations). It's sort of like the general difference between Engineering and Sciences, where Science analyzes the nature (of his field), notes observations and hypothesizes while Engineering creates things based on those observations then analyzes.


So, choosing B.C.S. will be a waste for me unless I just want to see how things work and not actually make them? Well, that's not what I want to do.

#4
Sephern

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So, choosing B.C.S. will be a waste for me unless I just want to see how things work and not actually make them? Well, that's not what I want to do.

Not quite. Learning the theory behind Computer Science, and how computers work, will improve your ability to make software. It really depends on the course itself. The title isn't as important as what they teach.

If you're going to university to study computing, then you want something more than people just teaching you languages and how to make software. You can teach yourself that or get it with professional experience. Learning things like data structures, algorithmic complexity, and basic relevant mathematics, as well as important theoretical aspects of programming (like concurrency, etc) are all things which will probably benefit you more.




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